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Monday, April 12, 2010

Salt Water Fishing From a Pier

Salt Water Fishing From a Pier

Sunday, April 11, 2010

How to cook shark meat


Have you ever eaten shark meat that tasted somewhat simmilar to the inside of a tennis ball? If so, that's because the person cooking the shark didn't prepare it correctly, or either it wasn't cooked properly. Chances are it was the former to blame for the rubber-like consistency.

Sharks are practically all muscle. Their skeletons aren't made of bone, but of cartilage. To make the shark fillets or shark steals tender and fit to eat, those strong muscle fibers have to be broken down.

The article about this will give you the proper steps to ensure that your shark meat is flaky and tender. Cooking tips will also be provided. Click the following link, or click the appropriate title to get the info: http://hubpages.com/hub/How-to-Prepare-and-Cook-Shark-Meat

Southern Cuisine: How to Prepare and Cook Shark Meat

Southern Cuisine: How to Prepare and Cook Shark Meat

Throw a low country boil


A low country boil is a wonderful southern tradition! It's a great way to share delicious food, good times, and catching up with friends, neighbors, and family. Best of all, there's not a lot of work involved for the host and hostess. Preparation, cooking, and cleanup are a snap.

To get some ideas for your next low country boil, click the appropriate title. If you want to make your own cocktail sauce for your boiled shrimp, find that title and click it!

Easy Entertaining Tips: Low Country Boil

Easy Entertaining Tips: Low Country Boil

Southern Cuisine: Crab Stew

Southern Cuisine: Crab Stew

Southern Cuisine: Holle's Oyster Stew

Southern Cuisine: Holle's Oyster Stew

Southern Cuisine: Holle's Buttermilk Hushpuppies

Southern Cuisine: Holle's Buttermilk Hushpuppies

How to Catch a Big Redfish - with Fishing Video

How to Catch a Big Redfish - with Fishing Video

Fishing tips for catching big reds


Most of you seasoned anglers know that to catch a big fish of a certain species, you often have to employ different strategies and tactics than you would for a small fish of the same species. This is certainly true of reds.

Reds, red drum, red bass, spot-tail bass, channel bass - whatever you want to call them - are great fun to catch, but the big ones can be wily. They didn't get that old and that big by being dumb.

This is a great article with saltwater fishing tips for beginners to understand the low-down on big reds. And after you catch your red and fillet it, use my recipe for blackened redfish, found below. Here's the link to the article: http://hubpages.com/hub/how-to-catch-a-big-redfish

Southern Cuisine: Blackened Redfish

Southern Cuisine: Blackened Redfish

Easy Oyster Recipes, with My Secret Sauce Recipe

Easy Oyster Recipes, with My Secret Sauce Recipe

Easy Oyster Recipes, with My Secret Sauce Recipe

Easy Oyster Recipes, with My Secret Sauce Recipe

Southern Cuisine: Buttermilk Fried Shrimp

Southern Cuisine: Buttermilk Fried Shrimp

Charter Fishing and Party Fishing Boats: Know Before You Go

Charter Fishing and Party Fishing Boats: Know Before You Go

Tuesday, April 6, 2010

Fishing tips: Best flounder baits




I love flounder fishing! In fact, I think it's my favorite angling of all. There's really not a lot of work required in catching one of these flatfish, and they're superb on the table. With a few saltwater fishing tips, you'll be well on your way to dining on some great grub!

What's the best bait for flounder? That largely depends on who you ask. For example, in North Carolina and in the Chesapeake Bay, many flounder fishermen use strips of cut bait to entice their prey. In Georgia and Florida, however, I've never seen this bait used for flounder.

Among my circle of flounder fishermen, we prefer live shrimp, finger mullet, and mud minnows as our choices for natural baits. I've caught the largest flounder - the real doormats - on finger mullet. Of course, these aren't always available. Live shrimp are effective, but they die so quickly that they're sometimes aggravating. Also, smaller fish species will often eat the shrimp. If you have a nice stout finger mullet on, you'll decrease your chances of catching undesired fish.

Mud minnows usually work well, also, but not as well as the mullet. One problem with buying mud minnows is that some of them are really too small to entice a decent sized flounder. Try to pick out larger mud minnows if you have a choice.

For artificials, I've had the best luck with ledhead jigs. I use a red ledhead paired with a pink or white soft grub. Some fishermen tip the hook with a small bit of shrimp, but I don't.

To read more about flounder fishing, go here: http://hubpages.com/hub/fishing-for-flounder

Cast nets


If you're an avid saltwater angler and can't throw a cast net, you don't know what you're missing! Catching fresh bait is a must for serious saltwater fishing. You're passing up some of the best baits you can find! And best of all, they're free.

When the mullet are running, it's easy to fill your bait bucket with finger mullet just the right size for those trophy reds and flounder, along with other fish species, by cast netting. Of course, you'll also have the chance to haul in some big mullet to use for sharks and other large fish. If you enjoy fried mullet or smoked mullet, you can catch plenty in even a small cast net.

Also, some cast netters overlook the fact that they can catch shrimp with their cast nets. The small ones can be used for bait, and the larger ones can be fried, boiled, or grilled. There's just nothing like eating really fresh shrimp right out of the ocean!

If you want to learn to throw a cast net the easy way, click the link. There's a video included:http://hubpages.com/hub/Cast-Nets-Tips

Saturday, April 3, 2010

Chumming

We've all had those slow days - times when we couldn't entice a single fish to bite, no matter what delicacy we offered the finned critters. It's almost like the fish are suffering from an extreme case of lockjaw. You might be able to awaken their appetites, however, with chumming! Check out these saltwater fishing tips for chumming.

Chum spreads small bits of blood and bait through the water as it travels on the natural currents. It can reach a lot of fish in a relatively short amount of time. When it does, fish often go into a feeding frenzy when competing with others members of their school, and they throw caution to the wind, making them much more likely to bite your hook.

You can purchase chum or make your own, and you can chum effectively from a boat, a pier, a bridge, or even if the surf.

To learn more about chumming and how to make your own, go here:
http://hubpages.com/hub/Saltwater-Fishing-How-to-Make-and-Use-Chum-Effectively